Malocclusion or Irregular Alignment of Teeth

Malocclusion / Irregular Alignment of Teeth

Crowding (Crooked teeth)

Crooked teeth are irregular teeth that affect millions of people all over the globe. There are many reasons why teeth can become crooked throughout the different stages of our lives. Here are some of the most common causes: genetics, thumb sucking, ageing. Braces are a very effective way to straighten crooked teeth.

Class II malocclusion

This condition is mostly associated with short lower jaw with normal or large upper jaw. Upper teeth are often forwardly placed. There are many reasons for Class II malocclusion including genetics, thumb sucking. Removable braces are very effective in treating Class II malocclusion in young age (10-14 years) and later by fixed braces, if untreated some of them may require jaw surgery.

Class III malocclusion

This condition is mostly associated with short upper jaw (less developed) with normal or large lower jaw. Upper teeth are often backwardly placed. Most common reason for Class III malocclusion is genetics. Functional Appliances (Orthopaedic) are very effective in treating Class III malocclusion in children (6-11 years), but some of these children may require jaw surgery in late teen age (17-18 years).

Deep bite (Closed bite)

If you have a deep bite, it means your upper front teeth bite too deeply (overlap) over the lower front teeth and your lower incisors make contact with gum tissue in the your jaw. Braces are a very effective way in treating closed bite.

common dental diseasesngh
common dental diseasesngh
common dental diseasesngh
common dental diseasesngh

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